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Before Fantagraphics started The Complete Peanuts series, Schulz's Peanuts strips were reprinted in books as early as 1952. The books are very different from the Complete Peanuts series because they contain fewer strips, typically no more than a year's worth, not entirely in chronological order, and they do not have written introductions. Below is a list of the Peanuts reprint books published in the United States.

FirstEditionPeanuts

Front cover of a first edition of the 1952 book Peanuts.


The first series of Peanuts reprint books were published initially by Rinehart & Co., Inc., and later by the merged entity it became part of in 1960, Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc. (HRW). The content of these books was later re-issued in different formats in later years, so that they appear in the following formats:

  • The Original books were paperbacks measuring 5 inches by 8 inches (13cm x 20cm) mostly in "portrait" format, with 124 pages of strip content: two daily strips per page (each in a 2x2 panel grid layout) or one Sunday strip per page. The first three books that collected only Sunday strips were originally in "landscape" format, so full Sunday strips could be presented. The last two Sunday-only collections switched to "portrait" format like the daily collections, with each Sunday strip presented in a modified "Tabloid" layout, where the strip's top-right panel was included, but a like-sized portion of the top tier (usually the left-most) containing the title was omitted, so all "story" panels were included. After two such Sunday collections were issued, Sundays were subsequently mixed with dailies in single volumes. In late 1967 the three original "landscape" volumes were reformatted in the newer "portrait" arrangement, which paved the way for their inclusion in the later Peanuts Parade line, plus, in the case of the volume titled Peanuts Every Sunday, inclusion of its content in the large-format compilation titled Peanuts Treasury. In the 1970s HRW printed hardback editions for Weekly Reader Books, a company providing books for schools; these editions were variously complete or shortened versions (96 or 76 pages) of the Originals.
  • Fawcett books, beginning in 1962, were standard "pocket book" size paperbacks published by Fawcett, initially under their Crest imprint, and then in a few years simply as Fawcett Crest. Each contained 124 pages of content, with one daily strip per page, or a Sunday strip spread across a left and right page (two pages), in either case with the panels broken up to fit the page layout. These books republished the contents of earlier Original books, where each Fawcett volume could accommodate exactly half of an Original; thus, two Fawcetts were issued from each Original book. When the Peanuts Parade line later replaced the Original line for new volumes, Fawcetts were issued from them also, as well as from their successor, the Topper books line.
  • Peanuts Parade paperback books became HRW's new format for Peanuts reprint books beginning in 1975. Each measured 7 by 10 inches (18cm x 25cm), and had 188 pages of content, or two pages more than 1½ times an Original book. The Parade line re-issued the contents of existing Original books, as well as offering new volumes for succeeding years. Each re-issue volume included one entire Original book, plus half of a second Original book; and was "paired" with a second Parade book that started with the second half of the prior incomplete Original followed by a complete third Original. The Parade books were a numbered series, although the numbering through 20 was arbitrary, as that was the range that included all re-issue volumes, but not in chronological order. Three Fawcett books were later issued from each new-content Parade book, however accommodating only 186 of the Parade book's 188 pages of content, leaving out the last two pages.
  • Peanuts Classics were a line of paperback re-issues of Original books and new-content Parade books put out in the 1990s by the same company (now known by the name of primary parent Henry Holt) after it was no longer the company issuing new volumes. These were the same size and number of pages as Original books, thus in many cases direct re-issues of Originals (although in some instances corrupted by editorial blunders). Those Originals that had been issued whole in a Parade book were put out with the Parade title, like a shortened version of the Parade book. Originals split between two Parades were issued under their original title. Parades that had had new content became literally shortened versions of their original selves; these were "paired" like Original-re-issue Parades, so that the one-third left off the end of a "first" one was matched with the first third of a "second", and issued with a brand-new title, while the remaining two-thirds of the "second" was also issued as a shortened version of the original Parade. Just as with Fawcetts issued from Parade books, the last two pages of an original Parade could not be accommodated in this arrangement. Every Classics volume sported new cover design and title-page art, regardless of what its original form was.
  Includes only daily strips   All subsequent editions of such volumes
  inherit the properties of their antecedents.  
  Includes only Sunday strips  
Original Years Fawcett/year issued Parade Classics
Peanuts 1950-1952 Note: Not included in any subsequent edition. Covers from basically the strip's beginning (the first strip actually included is from Thursday, October 12, 1950) through the week in March 1952 when Lucy first appeared, although not including either of her appearances that week. Provides about 55% inclusion of strips.
More Peanuts 1952-1954 The Wonderful World of Peanuts '62 #13 There Goes the Shutout There Goes the Shutout
Hey, Peanuts! '62
Good Grief, More Peanuts! 1952-1956 Good Grief, Charlie Brown! '63 Good Grief, More Peanuts
For the Love of Peanuts! '63 #14 Always Stick Up for the Underbird Not included
Good ol' Charlie Brown 1955-1957 Fun with Peanuts '63 Always Stick Up for the Underbird
Here Comes Charlie Brown! '64
Notes
  • More Peanuts picks up with a four-month gap after where Peanuts left off, in July 1952, and covers through mid-February 1954, providing about 50% inclusion of strips for that period.
  • Good Grief, More Peanuts! covers Sundays ostensibly from their beginning (which was January 6, 1952), but its earliest strip actually included was from June 22, 1952. It continues up through April 1956, providing about 61% inclusion within its actual range of dates. The first two pages that would normally have reprinted Sunday strips are instead devoted to a "gallery" of the strip's nine characters, constituting a formal declaration of the dropping of Charlotte Braun, especially with the space where she could have been shown instead humorously depicting "Beethoven" as a character. With the Peanuts Classics edition of the book, an editorial gaffe resulted in it having only its first half from its original self, with the remainder made up of half of what was originally More Peanuts, repeating part of what was also issued in the Classics edition of There Goes the Shutout.
  • Good ol' Charlie Brown covers daily strips from the beginning of 1955, leaving a 10½-month gap following the end of More Peanuts, skipping over such events as the introduction of "Pig-Pen" and the majority of appearances of Charlotte Braun (besides omitting her three appearances from 1955 as well). It covers through April 1957, providing only about 34% inclusion, or approximately one third.
Snoopy 1955-1958 Here Comes Snoopy '66 #5 What Makes You Think You're Happy? What Makes You Think You're Happy?
Good Ol' Snoopy '67
You're Out of Your Mind, Charlie Brown! 1955-1958 Very Funny, Charlie Brown '65 You're Out of Your Mind, Charlie Brown!
What Next, Charlie Brown? '65 #6 Fly, You Stupid Kite, Fly!
But We Love You, Charlie Brown 1957-1959 We're on Your Side, Charlie Brown '66 Fly, You Stupid Kite, Fly!
You Are Too Much, Charlie Brown '66
Notes
  • Snoopy collects daily strips specifically featuring Snoopy, beginning its coverage, like Good ol' Charlie Brown, at the beginning of 1955. This collection repeats a substantial number of strips from the former, as well as including "new" strips from the same period, and continues its coverage into early April 1958.
  • You're Out of Your Mind, Charlie Brown! continues right where the previous Sunday collection left off, and covers through mid-October 1958. In addition, despite the listed copyrights dates starting with 1956, it "picks up" three previously omitted Sunday strips from September 1955. The book provides near-100% inclusion of its main coverage period, as would all subsequent Sundays-only collections. The listed copyrights include 1959, but it contains no strips from that year, as that apparently stands for the "book" copyright date.
  • But We Love You, Charlie Brown continues right after Good ol' Charlie Brown (and "picks up" 18 strips from earlier in 1957, within the prior book's coverage period), and covers up to late February 1959 (excluding strips that already appeared in Snoopy), resulting in about 56% inclusion from its main period.
Peanuts Revisited 1955-1959 Note: The last "Rinehart" book, hardback; much thicker than other Original books (214 pages). A "retrospective" of 1950s Peanuts, although it contains nothing prior to 1955. Repeats selected dailies from Good Ol' Charlie Brown, Snoopy, and But We Love You, Charlie Brown. Repeats Sundays, in standard "Tabloid" format that omits the top right panel, from You're Out of Your Mind, Charlie Brown! Contains some "new" dailies from 1957 to early 1959, and is the primary reprint of dailies for the period from February to May 1959, with near-100% inclusion. Its last six "new" dailies, the first week of the story of the birth of Sally, were subsequently repeated in Go Fly a Kite, Charlie Brown, and several others in Snoopy, Come Home. Has slightly more than enough "primary" dailies for one Fawcett, but none was ever issued, nor was it included in the Parade or Classics lines. The large-format HRW book entitled Peanuts Treasury picks up precisely where this leaves off. In addition to one short-length Weekly Reader edition, a second volume with the last 122 pages was issued, entitled I Feel Lonely When I'm All Alone.
Go Fly a Kite, Charlie Brown 1959-1960 You're a Winner, Charlie Brown '66 #9 Thank Goodness for People Thank Goodness for People
Let's Face It, Charlie Brown '67
Peanuts Every Sunday 1958-1961 Who Do You Think You Are, Charlie Brown? '68 Peanuts Every Sunday
You're My Hero, Charlie Brown '68 #10 What Makes Musicians So Sarcastic?
It's a Dog's Life, Charlie Brown 1960-1961 This is Your Life, Charlie Brown '68 What Makes Musicians So Sarcastic?
Slide, Charlie Brown! Slide! '68
Notes
  • Go Fly a Kite, Charlie Brown begins with the last week that had appeared in Peanuts Revisited, starting, and then continuing, the story of the birth of Sally, and proceeds through mid-March 1960, providing near-100% inclusion of that period.
  • Peanuts Every Sunday skips one week after the end of the previous Sunday collection, and continues into early March 1961. It also "picks up" the earlier-1958 strip of February 23rd of that year.
  • It's a Dog's Life, Charlie Brown skips one week of dailies after the previous collection (the "whirlydog" story that would ultimately appear in Snoopy, Come Home), and continues into late June 1961, providing about 63% inclusion as of its publication. Once again, the last listed copyright year, 1962, covers none of its strip content, and is apparently the "book" copyright date.
Snoopy, Come Home 1958-1962 We Love You, Snoopy '70 #7 The Mad Punter Strikes Again The Mad Punter Strikes Again
You Can't Win, Charlie Brown 1960-1962 All This and Snoopy, Too '69 You Can't Win, Charlie Brown
Here's to You, Charlie Brown '69 #8 A Kiss on the Nose Turns Anger Aside
You Can Do It, Charlie Brown 1962-1963 Nobody's Perfect, Charlie Brown '69 A Kiss on the Nose Turns Anger Aside
You're a Brave Man, Charlie Brown '69
Notes
  • Snoopy, Come Home was actually published after You Can't Win, Charlie Brown, but is listed first here to illustrate how the books were later re-issued in the Parade line. It is the second collection of dailies focusing on Snoopy, and, like its predecessor, repeats many strips from earlier volumes (including You Can't Win), as well as including "new" strips from the same period, and continuing with later strips featuring Snoopy (into mid-October 1962). Its stated copyright years go all the way back to 1955, but it actually contains nothing prior to 1958, picking up where Snoopy left off.
  • You Can't Win, Charlie Brown continues where It's a Dog's Life, Charlie Brown left off (and in fact "picks up" a good number of strips from the prior book's coverage period), and continues to late March 1962, beginning a period of a few years of near-100% inclusion of daily strips, such that between this book, It's a Dog's Life, Charlie Brown, and Snoopy, Come Home, every single daily strip of 1961 appears in reprint, except the strip of Christmas Day.
  • You Can Do It, Charlie Brown repeats the last week of strips that appeared in You Can't Win, Charlie Brown (the story of Linus acting as a "baseball scout"), and continues into mid-May 1963. Fawcett editions were issued from this volume before Snoopy, Come Home, and in the first of these, Nobody's Perfect, Charlie Brown, ten strips were left out, including seven that also appeared in other books (the six strips of the Linus-as-baseball-scout story, plus one that would subsequently be repeated in As You Like It, Charlie Brown) and three that did not appear elsewhere; and the remaining space at the end of You're a Brave Man, Charlie Brown was filled with ten strips actually from the beginning portion of Snoopy, Come Home.
  • We Love You, Snoopy was the only Fawcett edition issued to cover Snoopy, Come Home in particular, being that the source consisted largely of strips repeated from earlier volumes, with the ostensible goal of the Fawcett selections being to avoid that repetition; however, the issued volume achieved far less than perfect results, with some repetition remaining, and much non-repeated material left out.
  • As the Parade book The Mad Punter Strikes Again covered two source volumes with overlapping content, a total of nine daily strips appeared twice within it, occurring in both of its respective source volumes' sections.
  • Likewise, the Parade book A Kiss on the Nose Turns Anger Aside contains two occurrences of the Linus-as-baseball-scout story, from the edition's two source volumes respectively.
We're Right Behind You, Charlie Brown 1958-1963 Peanuts for Everybody '70 #3 There's a Vulture Outside There's a Vulture Outside
You've Done it Again, Charlie Brown '70
Sunday's Fun Day, Charlie Brown 1962-1965 It's for You, Snoopy '71 Sunday's Fun Day, Charlie Brown
Have It Your Way, Charlie Brown '71 #4 What's Wrong with Being Crabby?
As You Like It, Charlie Brown 1963-1964 Charlie Brown and Snoopy '70 What's Wrong with Being Crabby?
You're the Greatest, Charlie Brown '71
Notes
  • We're Right Behind You, Charlie Brown "picks up" the Sunday strip skipped right before the previous Sunday collection began, as well as all three of the strips omitted from within its coverage period, including the second part of a two-Sunday story arc whose first part had been included in the earlier volume. This then continues into mid-July 1963. For the third time, the last listed copyright year, 1964, covers none of its strip content, and is apparently the "book" copyright date. The Fawcetts issued from this book leave out one strip from it, that of January 21, 1962.
  • Sunday's Fun Day, Charlie Brown was actually published after As You Like It, Charlie Brown, but is listed first here to illustrate how the books were later re-issued in the Parade line. This book repeats 20 strips from the previous Sunday collection, and continues to just the start of August 1965. About half of the 20 repeated strips appear twice in early printings of the Parade volume There's a Vulture Outside; in later printings an attempt was made to resolve this by re-arranging strips between that volume and What's Wrong with Being Crabby?, but errors were made in the process. When the Peanuts Classics editions were issued, a restoration was attempted, which ended up only compounding the earlier errors.
  • As You Like It, Charlie Brown begins where You Can Do It, Charlie Brown left off, and continues to just the start of June 1964, providing about 77% inclusion.
You Need Help, Charlie Brown 1964-1965 You're Not for Real, Snoopy '71 #1 Who's the Funny-Looking Kid with the Big Nose? Who's the Funny-Looking Kid with the Big Nose?
You're a Pal, Snoopy '72
The Unsinkable Charlie Brown 1965-1966 What Now, Charlie Brown? '72 The Unsinkable Charlie Brown
You're Something Special, Snoopy! '72 #2 It's a Long Way to Tipperary
You'll Flip, Charlie Brown 1965-1967 You've Got a Friend, Charlie Brown '72 It's a Long Way to Tipperary
Take It Easy, Charlie Brown '73
Notes
  • You Need Help, Charlie Brown begins where the previous daily collection left off, and continues into mid-December 1965, providing only about 50% inclusion.
  • The Unsinkable Charlie Brown begins the practice of combining daily and Sunday comics together, carrying on where the respective previous collections left off, and continuing into early October 1966, providing about 67% inclusion as of its publication. The book's title is a play on the title of the 1964 movie musical The Unsinkable Molly Brown, about the life of the titular heroic survivor of the Titanic.
  • You'll Flip, Charlie Brown largely rehashes the coverage period of its predecessor, and advances to mid-March 1967, achieving near-100% inclusion for the entire period.
You're Something Else, Charlie Brown 1967 Your Choice, Snoopy '73 #17 A Smile Makes a Lousy Umbrella A Smile Makes a Lousy Umbrella
Try It Again, Charlie Brown '74
You're You, Charlie Brown 1967-1968 Who Was that Dog I Saw You With, Charlie Brown? '73 You've Come a Long Way, Charlie Brown
There's No One Like You, Snoopy '73 #18 My Anxieties Have Anxieties Not included
You've Had It, Charlie Brown 1968-1969 You've Got It Made, Snoopy '74 My Anxieties Have Anxieties
Don't Give Up, Charlie Brown '74
Notes
  • You're Something Else, Charlie Brown carries on where its predecessor left off to early December 1967, providing about 85% inclusion.
  • You're You, Charlie Brown continues from its predecessor to late July 1968 (plus the Sunday strip of August 11, 1968), providing about 93% inclusion of its main period. An editorial gaffe in the Peanuts Classics line resulted in its edition of You've Come a Long Way, Charlie Brown containing only the second half of that Original volume followed by the first half of You're You, Charlie Brown, with no other volume issued to cover the missing halves of each.
  • You've Had It, Charlie Brown continues after non-coinciding two-week gaps of dailies and Sundays — skipping such events as the introduction of Franklin and the first two weeks of a four-week Sunday story arc about Snoopy losing his supper dish to the cat next door — and proceeds to early May 1969, providing about 78% inclusion.
You're Out of Sight, Charlie Brown 1968-1970 You're So Smart, Snoopy '74 #19 It's Great to be a Super Star It's Great to be a Super Star
Watch Out, Charlie Brown '75
You've Come a Long Way, Charlie Brown 1970-1971 It's All Yours, Snoopy '75 Not included
You've Got to Be You, Snoopy '75 #20 Stop Snowing on My Secretary You've Come a Long Way, Charlie Brown
“Ha Ha Herman,” Charlie Brown 1971-1972 You're on Your Own, Snoopy '75 Stop Snowing on My Secretary
You Can't Win Them All, Charlie Brown '75
Notes
  • You're Out of Sight, Charlie Brown "picks up" three daily strips from December 1968 (not acknowledged in its listed copyright years), and continues from its predecessor to mid-May 1970, providing about 58% inclusion. This book introduces new graphic design to the Original series, now plastic-coated paperbacks with line-framed cover illustrations in full color. Earlier volumes subsequently reprinted were converted to this new style, with the exception of Peanuts Revisited.
  • You've Come a Long Way, Charlie Brown continues from its predecessor to the end of May 1971, maintaining a trend of about 58% inclusion. For the Peanuts Classics version of the title, see the note above for You're You, Charlie Brown.
  • “Ha Ha Herman,” Charlie Brown continues from its predecessor to near the end of May 1972, inching up to about 59% inclusion.
Thompson Is in Trouble, Charlie Brown 1972-1973 You've Come a Long Way, Snoopy '76 #15 It's Hard Work Being Bitter It's Hard Work Being Bitter
That's Life, Snoopy '76
You're the Guest of Honor, Charlie Brown 1972-1973 It's Your Turn, Snoopy '76 You're the Guest of Honor, Charlie Brown
You Asked for It, Charlie Brown '76 #16 How Long, Great Pumpkin, How Long?
Win a Few, Lose a Few, Charlie Brown 1973-1974 Play Ball, Snoopy '76 How Long, Great Pumpkin, How Long?
They're Playing Your Song, Charlie Brown '77
Notes
  • Thompson Is in Trouble, Charlie Brown continues from its predecessor to mid-January 1973 (plus the Sunday strip of February 4, 1973), providing about 93% inclusion.
  • You're the Guest of Honor, Charlie Brown backtracks to mid-December 1972, and proceeds up to mid-August 1973, providing near-100% inclusion.
  • Win a Few, Lose a Few, Charlie Brown continues from its predecessor to late March 1974, maintaining near-100% inclusion.

The following Peanuts Parade books were issued with new content. The lengthier volumes published annually consistently provided near-100% inclusion. (All subsequent lines would have either complete or near-complete inclusion.) The Parade edition of Here Comes the April Fool! was offered by Scholastic Books, a company selling mail-order books in schools, under the title You're Barking Up the Wrong Tree, Snoopy! When The Way of the Fussbudget Is Not Easy was re-issued in the Peanuts Classics line, one volume was released, and the remaining one-third of the original Parade volume was not included in the series.

No. Parade Years Fawcett Classics
11 Speak Softly, and Carry a Beagle 1974-1975 You've Got to Be Kidding, Snoopy Speak Softly, and Carry a Beagle
It's Show Time, Snoopy
Keep Up the Good Work, Charlie Brown Duck, Here Comes Another Day
12 Don't Hassle Me with Your Sighs, Chuck 1975-1976 It's Raining on Your Parade, Charlie Brown
Think Thinner, Snoopy Don't Hassle Me with Your Sighs, Chuck
Let's Hear It for Dinner, Snoopy
21 Summers Fly, Winters Walk 1976-1977 Think About It Tomorrow, Snoopy Summers Fly, Winters Walk
Love and Kisses, Snoopy
Stay With It, Snoopy The Cheshire Beagle
22 The Beagle Has Landed 1977-1978 Jogging Is In, Snoopy
Snoopy, Top Dog The Beagle Has Landed
Sing for Your Supper, Snoopy
23 And a Woodstock in a Birch Tree 1978-1979 You're Our Kind of Dog, Snoopy And a Woodstock in a Birch Tree
Blaze the Trail, Snoopy
This Is the Best Time of the Day, Charlie Brown Nothing Echoes Like an Empty Mailbox
24 Here Comes the April Fool! 1979-1980 Look Out Behind You, Snoopy
Don't Bet On It, Snoopy Here Comes the April Fool!
Up and At 'Em, Snoopy
25 Dr. Beagle and Mr. Hyde 1980-1981 It's Chow Time, Snoopy Dr. Beagle and Mr. Hyde
We're All in This Together
Go For It, Charlie Brown I Heard a D-Minus Call Me
26 You're Weird, Sir! 1981-1982 Sweet Dreams, Charlie Brown
How Does She Do That, Charlie Brown? You're Weird, Sir!
You're Hopeless, Charlie Brown
27 Kiss Her, You Blockhead! 1982 Take Charge, Snoopy Kiss Her, You Blockhead!
Let's Party, Charlie Brown
Good Morning, Snoopy Sarcasm Does Not Become You, Ma'am
28 I'm Not Your Sweet Babboo! 1983 Go Fish, Snoopy!
She Likes You, Charlie Brown! I'm Not Your Sweet Babboo!
Get Physical, Snoopy!
29 The Way of the Fussbudget Is Not Easy 1983-1984 You're an Ace, Snoopy! The Way of the Fussbudget Is Not Easy
How Romantic, Charlie Brown
Nice Shot, Snoopy! Not included

In addition to the regular reprint line, HRW released five large-format hardback compilations, measuring 9 by 11 inches (23cm x 28cm), with approximately 200 pages. Each page had either five daily strips, or one Sunday strip. While the majority of the content had been previously reprinted, starting with the second volume there was a small percentage of strips not previously reprinted, and the Sundays were in color.

Title Years Theme
Peanuts Treasury 1959-1967 General. Note: Contains only previously reprinted strips, excerpts from Go Fly a Kite, Charlie Brown to You're Something Else, Charlie Brown inclusive. Sundays are in black-and-white. Picks up precisely where Peanuts Revisited left off.
Peanuts Classics 1963-1970 General. Note: Not related to the later like-named re-issues.
The Snoopy Festival 1968-1973 Snoopy
Sandlot Peanuts 1961-1976 Baseball
Classroom Peanuts 1970-1982 School

Later, the company under the new designation Henry Holt also published a smaller baseball-themed compilation, from which two Fawcetts were also released.

Title Years Fawcett
Big League Peanuts 19??-1985 Strike Three, Charlie Brown
Good Catch, Snoopy!

In 1985 the Peanuts reprint line was taken up by the Topper books imprint of Pharos books, which was owned by Scripps-Howard, the company that also owned United Feature Syndicate, so that the strips were effectively reprinted "in-house". These were dubbed Peanuts Collector Series. The books were all in "landscape" format, with the first four measuring 5 by 8½ inches (13cm x 21cm), the next three measuring 7 by 10 inches (18cm x 25cm), and the last one 8½ by 11 inches (21cm x 28cm). Each volume contained slightly more than the equivalent of three-quarters of an HRW "Original"; thus three Fawcetts were issued for each pair of these volumes, providing a little less than complete coverage. These were the final books from which Fawcetts would be issued.

Topper Year(s) Fawcett
Dogs Don't Eat Dessert 1985 You're Supposed to Lead, Charlie Brown
Hold the Fort, Snoopy
You're on the Wrong Foot Again, Charlie Brown 1985
Have No Fear, Snoopy
By Supper Possessed 1986 You're a Knockout, Charlie Brown
It's Party Time, Snoopy
Talk Is Cheep, Charlie Brown 1986-1987
School's Out, Charlie Brown
It Doesn't Take Much to Attract a Crowd 1987 Get Back to Nature, Snoopy
Hats Off to You, Charlie Brown
If Beagles Could Fly 1987
Have a Ball, Snoopy
Don't Be Sad, Flying Ace 1987-1988 Guess Who, Charlie Brown
You're Not Alone, Charlie Brown
Could You Be More Pacific? 1988
Lead On, Snoopy!

Andrews and McMeel were next to take up Peanuts reprints, issuing two volumes measuring 8½ inches wide by 9 inches tall (approx. 21cm x 23cm), with 124 pages of content, like HRW Original books; however, putting three dailies on each page instead of two, albeit not always filling the page with that many. Around the World in 45 Years was a 45-year commemorative book, with a relatively short memoir by Schulz on doing 45 years of Peanuts, while the bulk of the book was a reprint section of a complete "year of Peanuts", from May 31, 1993 to May 29, 1994, with Sunday strips in color.

Andrews and McMeel Year(s)
Being a Dog Is a Full-Time Job 1989
Make Way for the King of the Jungle 1989-1990
Around the World in 45 Years 1993-1994

Harper Perennial came next, with a line called Peanuts Treasury (no relation to the like-named single HRW compilation), measuring 5 by 8 inches (13cm x 20cm) in "landscape" format, with 174 pages of content. The first volume picked up at the start of 1991, leaving a gap of over seven months after where Make Way for the King of the Jungle left off. The latter two volumes of this series also overlapped with Around the World in 45 Years.

Harper Perennial Year
Now That's Profound, Charlie Brown 1991
I Told You So, You Blockhead! 1992
Dogs Are Worth It! 1993
The World Is Filled with Mondays 1994

Ballantine Books covered the strip's final years, with books measuring 8½ inches wide by 9 inches tall (approx. 21cm x 23cm), with generally 157 pages of content. Sunday strips were in color (albeit in standard "Tabloid" format that omitted the top right panel), and in most cases, dailies as well. "Big Books" compiled multiple volumes together.

Ballantine Year(s) Big Book
It Was a Dark and Stormy Night, Snoopy 1995 More Peanuts Collection
The World According to Lucy 1996
It's a Big World, Charlie Brown 1997 Peanuts Collection
It's a Dog's Life, Snoopy 1998
Peanuts 2000 1999-2000

External links